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Medical Advice > ivy.gs/advice

Ivy Grove Surgery : Medical conditions : Common Ailments

Useful numbers and contacts

Check your symptoms

Medical advice


On this page, we are providing information and supporting links on the treatment of some of the most common conditions seen in general practice as well as some general health advice, and what to do in more serious and emergency situations, so that you can get the most appropriate care in the most timely fashion.

Visit the relevant area now:
General questions | Common conditions | More serious conditions | Potentially life-threatening conditions

IMPORTANT
The information regarding various clinical conditions shown in various areas of our website and their related external links are provided for your convenience. The information shown is not intended to be a full and comprehensive guide to these conditions, nor is it intended to replace the advice of a dedicated health professional. If you are unsure about your medical condition, please contact your doctor, pharmacist or call NHS 111 (link opens in a new window) on 111 or consider contacting other relevant organisations.

General Questions

Do I need to see the doctor or nurse?

Our nurses can treat many conditions effectively and efficiently without the need to book a doctor's appointment. ► More info

  • All aspects of family planning
  • Blood pressure measurement
  • Blocked ears and wax
  • Dressings and removal of stitches
  • Health checks
  • Cardiovascular disease reviews
  • Diet and weight monitoring
  • Asthma and chronic bronchitis care
  • Travel advice and injections
  • Routine vaccinations (excluding TB)
  • Ring pessary fittings and changes
  • Cervical smears and vaginal swabs

If you need to see the nurse, the receptionist will ask the reason, so that enough time can be booked with the appropriate nurse and any necessary forms or equipment can be prepared.

Download an information poster This is a PDF download to find out some examples of what our nurses do.

Where can I check my symptoms?

You can use use our symptom checker page, or visit the NHS Symptom Checker (link opens in a new window).

Where else can I go to get help?

It may be frustrating to ring up and find that all of today's appointments have been taken up, but there are alternatives to seeing a doctor. There are many other ways to access medical help, that may be more appropriate to your needs. ► More info

All leaflet and poster downloads will open in a new window.

  • Back, neck or muscular problems ? Physio Direct on 01335 230075 - you can book an appointment without seeing a doctor first. Download a poster This is a PDF download.
  • Joint or arthritis problems and hand/arm splints? OT Direct on 01335 230075 - you can book an appointment without seeing a doctor first.
  • Medical advice? NHS 111 on 111 (link opens in a new window).
  • Need the morning after pill (emergency contraception)? Family Planning clinics at Alfreton, Heanor or Ilkeston, or Hurst Chemist or Manor Pharmacy in Ripley (see below for numbers).
  • Self help or minor illness advice needed? Speak to your local pharmacist (see below for numbers).
  • Common conditions information - See our website.
  • Dental problems? See your dentist. GPs are advised not to treat patients with dental conditions. If you are not registered with a dentist, you can ring NHS 111 for more information on your nearest facility or see below.
  • Anxiety and/or depression? (mild to moderate) Counselling Service - you can book an appointment without seeing a doctor first. Download a leaflet This is a PDF download.
  • Bladder and/or bowel continence issues? Continence Advisory Service on 01332 861198 - you can book an appointment without seeing a doctor first. Download a leaflet This is a PDF download.
  • Accident or injury, or think you may need an X-ray? Minor Injuries Unit at Ripley Hospital on 01773 710711. Download a poster This is a PDF download about types of conditions seen in Minor Injuries.
  • Chest pain, suspected stroke, bleeding or other life threatening emergencies? Ring 999 or attend the nearest major casualty department. In this area, this is the Royal Derby Hospital.
  • Need a walk-in centre? The nearest in this area are at Osmaston Road, Derby, St Thomas Road, Derby and Swadlincote, Derby. Ilkeston walk-in centre has now closed.
  • Not sure about your symptoms? Use our symptom checker for information on where you can go first for help

For more detailed general advice and information on the treatment of common ailments and more serious illnesses please see our page on medical conditions or visit our symptom checker if you are not sure who to turn to first.

Download an information poster This is a PDF download about other sources of help in the area.

When Should I Worry booklet

This is a PDF download When should I worry?

When should I worry about my child?

Having an ill child can be a very scary experience for parents. ► More info

Here is a specific guide available for parents of children with the common infections of coughs, colds, sore throats and earache. If you understand more about the illness it can help you to feel more in control and help you to know what you can do yourself to help your child to get better. The booklet is available to download This is a PDF download.

How do I recognise if my child has a more serious illness?

Please visit this useful link at NHS Choices (links opens in a new window).

Do I need to take my baby to A+E?

Please visit this useful link at NHS Choices (links opens in a new window).

Do I go to a walk-in centre, see my GP or ring NHS 111?

This useful leaflet This is a PDF download is part of the NHS Choose Well campaign (links open in a new window), which seeks to direct patients to the most appropriate source of help.

Do I need the Minor Injuries Unit (MIU)?

Minor Injuries Poster

This is a PDF download Do I need the MIU?

The Minor Injuries Unit at Ripley Hospital is well equipped to deal with many conditions. If you have had any falls, accidents, trauma, sprains or strains, and feel you need assessing, please present yourself to the department at Ripley Hospital, rather than book an appointment at the surgery. The Minor Injuries Unit will also deal with things like insect bites and foreign bodies. Download an information poster This is a PDF download on appropriate conditions that can be seen at the Minor Injuries Unit.

Where can I view self-help leaflets for my condition?

You can visit Patient UK for a wealth of information on medical conditions (link opens ina new window), or visit our downloads area for some links.

Visit the relevant area now:
Common conditions | More serious conditions | Potentially life-threatening conditions

Common Conditions (Treat Yourself)

Ivy Grove Surgery : Medical conditions : Coughs and Colds

Fever (high temperature) ► More info

Most fevers are caused by an infection or other illness. Fever helps your body fight infections by stimulating the body’s natural defences. By increasing the body’s temperature, a fever makes it harder for the bacteria and viruses that cause infections to survive. You can usually treat fever in young children at home using infant paracetamol. More information on fever, including when to see the GP, is provided at NHS Choices and BUPA (links open in a new window).

Diarrhoea and Vomiting ► More info

Diarrhoea can be caused by an infection and may be accompanied by vomiting. This is called gastroenteritis (a stomach bug). It is usually caused by a virus. In general, give extra fluids to replace the fluid that has been lost, but only give food if hungry.

You can help to prevent any infection spreading by using separate towels and encouraging hand washing after using the toilet and before eating. Also avoid returning to school or going back to work until at least 48 hours after the last bout of diarrhoea and vomiting. More information on gastroenteritis, including when to see the GP, is provided at NHS Choices and BUPA or download our minor illness leaflet This is a PDF download (links open in a new window).

Head lice ► More info

Head lice are tiny wingless insects that are grey-brown in colour. They are the size of a pinhead when they hatch and 3mm long (the size of a sesame seed) when fully grown. Head lice cannot fly, jump or swim. They are spread by head-to-head contact and climb from the hair of an infected person to the hair of someone else. For many people, head lice cause no symptoms. They can give you an itchy scalp.

Treatments include wet-combing or drug treatments, which are either non-insecticide and insecticide based. Your pharmacist can advise on these treatments. For more details of treatment of headlice, visit NHS Choices or BUPA (links open in a new window).

Nose bleeds ► More info

Nosebleeds are fairly common, particularly in children, and can usually be easily treated at home. It is important to apply the correct first aid measures as soon as possible. A common mistake is to let the nose continue to bleed 'to relieve pressure'. If you had cut your arm, you would not simply hang it over the sink and wait for it to stop, you would apply pressure - the same goes for your nose!

You must pinch the soft bit of the nose for at least 10 minutes. For more details of treatment of nose bleeds, visit NHS Choices or St John's Ambulance (links open in a new window). If bleeding is severe and not stopping despite pressure for more than 20 minutes, please attend the nearest major A+E department or ring 999 (see below).

Coughs and colds ► More info

Most people with a cough have a respiratory tract infection caused by a virus, such as the common cold, flu or bronchitis. The common cold in adults and children can give rise to a blocked nose, sneezing or a runny nose, cough, headache, aches and pains and feeling tired.

Treatment is with rest, plenty of fluids, steam inhalations, gargling, vapour rubs and paracetamol for aches and pains. For more details of treatment of coughs and colds, visit NHS Choices (coughs) and (colds) or BUPA or download our minor illness leaflet This is a PDF download (links open in a new window).

Flu ► More info

Flu can give rise to the same symptoms as a common cold (directly above), but symptoms are usually much worse and accompanied by a high temperature (in excess of 38°C). Treatment is as for the common cold. For more details of treatment of flu, including when to see the GP, visit NHS Choices or BUPA (links open in a new window).

Sore throats ► More info

Most sore throats are not serious and pass within three to seven days without the need for medical treatment. After a week, 85% of people will find that their symptoms have been resolved. Gargling with salt water, drinking warm liquids and sucking on throat lozenges can help to reduce the pain. For more details of treatment of sore throats, including when to see the GP, visit NHS Choices or BUPA or download our minor illness leaflet This is a PDF download (links open in a new window).

Earache ► More info

Earache is cited as the most common reason for parents to call a doctor out of hours for their child. It will often be the result of an ear infection. If earache has just started, and there is no high fever (greater than 38°C), headache, dizziness or swelling around the ear, it is safe to take painkillers and use a cold flannel held to the affected ear for pain relief.

Four out of five ear infections resolve within 3 days without the need for antibiotics. For more details of treatment of earache, including when to see the GP, visit NHS Choices or BUPA or download our minor illness leaflet This is a PDF download (links open in a new window).

Backache ► More info

Back pain is a common condition that affects most people at some point during their life. Most cases of back pain are associated with pain and stiffness in the lower back and can be treated by using a combination of medication and self-care techniques. Pain relief may come from either paracetamol based painkillers or non-steroidal anti-inflammatory painkillers, or non-drug treatments like hot or cold packs applied to the area.

Self-care may involve exercises, keeping active and continuing daily chores. Physiotherapy will help too. There is a free NHS service called Physio Direct that any adult can refer themselves to without seeing a doctor. The number is 01335 230079. For more details of treatment of back pain, including when to visit a GP if warning signs appear, visit NHS Choices or BUPA (links open in a new window).

Visit our symptom checker for more conditions.

Visit our help page for information on who else you can turn to for advice.

Visit the relevant area now:
General questions | Common conditions | More serious conditions | Potentially life-threatening conditions

More Serious Conditions (Go to A+E)

Ivy Grove Surgery : Medical conditions : Emergencies

The following conditions suggest a prompt attendance at the nearest major Accident and Emergency (Casualty) department. For this area, it is Royal Derby Hospital - view on Bing Maps (link opens in a new window).

A feverish and lethargic (drowsy) child

A feverish and floppy (unresponsive) infant

Difficulty breathing

Sudden, severe abdominal pain

Accidental or intentional overdose of tablets or medicines

Trauma (including falls) and broken bones


Visit our symptom checker for more conditions.

Visit the relevant area now:
General questions | Common conditions | More serious conditions | Potentially life-threatening conditions


Potentially Life-threatening Conditions (Ring 999)

The following conditions require immediate and urgent attention in order to preserve life. Ring 999 in these situations. Do not delay. Do not ring for an appointment at the surgery.

Chest pain (suspected heart attack)

"Chest pain is your body saying call 999". ► More info

The symptoms of a heart attack can include:

  • central chest pain; a dull pain, ache or 'heavy' feeling
  • pain spreading to the arms, neck, jaw, back or stomach
  • light-headedness, dizziness or shortness of breath
  • nausea or vomiting

Suspected stroke

"When Stroke Strikes, Act F.A.S.T. Call 999". ► More info

Stroke Fast leaflet

This is a PDF download Above link opens in a new window

  • Has their Face fallen on one side? Can they smile?
  • Can they raise both Arms and keep them there?
  • Is their Speech slurred?
  • Time to call 999 if you see any single one of these signs.

Download a leaflet This is a PDF download about Stroke: Act F.A.S.T. awareness.

Suspected meningitis

There are many resources on the internet advising about meningitis. Here are the main ones: Meningitis Trust, Meningitis Research Foundation and NHS Choices (links open in a new window).

Anaphylactic shock (severe allergy)

This may be suspected if there is sudden severe illness or collapse soon after an insect bite, eating a particular food or taking medication.

Heavy bleeding (from any source) or deep lacerations

Fluctuating levels of consciousness or completely unconscious

Difficulty breathing or stopped breathing with change in colour

Seizure, fit or uncontrollable shaking

Visit our symptom checker for more conditions.

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