IVY GROVE SURGERY ivy.gs Coronavirus GP 2.0 Help Symptoms Self-care Visits Register ivy.gs01773 514130

Coronavirus (COVID-19) - latest info and advice SHORTCUT ivy.gs/coronavirus

ALL THINGS
CORONAVIRUS
you are here

IVY GROVE SURGERY THANKS LOCAL HEROES ivy.gs/covid-thanks

Garden Guy Ltd for two lorry loads of bark for the surgery garden

White Peak Distillery at Ambergate for hand sanitiser

HL Plastics at Denby for face shields

Heanor Gate School at Heanor for face shields

Morrisons for Easter Eggs

THANK YOU FOR HELPING US TO HELP OTHERS
- WE REALLY DO APPRECIATE IT!

Get in touch if you think you can help!

This page is intended to keep our patients informed with the latest advice and guidance about coronavirus and will be updated regularly. This page was last updated on June 30, 2020 - new updates are highlighted.

WHAT'S ON THIS PAGE?

SUMMARY GUIDANCE

SUSPECTED CORONAVIRUS

If you develop a HIGH TEMPERATURE, NEW CONSTANT COUGH or LOSS OR CHANGE OF SMELL OR TASTE

DO NOT book an appointment
DO NOT come to surgery
DO self-isolate for 7 days if live alone
DO keep the whole household at home for 14 days if you live with others

Find out what to do if you are getting worse

SOCIAL DISTANCING ADVICE FOR ALL

Everyone should take measures to reduce spread of coronavirus

DO NOT have any contact with anyone with suspected coronavirus
DO NOT use public transport unless essential (wear face covering if you do)
DO work from home where possible
DO NOT attend the surgery - use phone or online services
DO follow complicated rules about bubbles and family numbers and what you can and cannot do until or after some particular random date
DO read official government guidance on this .

WHAT IS CORONAVIRUS?

Novel coronavirus, officially named COVID-19 by WHO, is a new respiratory illness that has not previously been seen in humans and which was first identified in Wuhan City in China.

Coronaviruses as a group, are common across the world, and cause symptoms including fever and a cough that may progress to a severe pneumonia causing breathing difficulties.

312,654 patients in the UK have tested positive for coronavirus and 43,730 of these have died [June 30, 2020]. View chart of cases by date.

On March 12, 2020, the risk level to the public was raised to high. On March 23, 2020, the country entered national lockdown. On June 19, 2020, the COVID-19 alert level was lowered from 4 (COVID-19 epidemic is in general circulation; transmission is high or rising exponentially) to 3 (COVID-19 epidemic is in general circulation). On July 4, 2020, the country will leave national lockdown.

UK coronavirus cases by date

If you are concerned you might have coronavirus, please do not come to the surgery. This is official government advice.

 

HOW DO I SUSPECT CORONAVIRUS?

Please consider the following three questions:

Q1. Have you got a fever?

A high temperature (37.8°C or more if you have a thermometer,
or if you feel hot to touch on your chest or back if you don't have a thermometer)

Q2. Have you developed a new continuous cough?

A new cough you haven't had before, or if you usually cough, it has got worse, and where you are coughing a lot more than an hour, or 3 or more coughing episodes in 24 hours

Q3. Has your sense of smell or taste changed or disappeared?

Smell and taste are deeply connected, so this applies to either or both sensations - if you have noticed you cannot smell or taste anything, or things smell or taste different to normal

 

If you answered YES to either Q1, Q2 or Q3, you might have coronavirus.

SUSPECTED CORONAVIRUS - WHAT DO I DO?

SUSPECTED CORONAVIRUS

If you think you have or might have coronavirus:

DO NOT book an appointment
DO NOT come to surgery
DO self-isolate for 7 days if live alone
DO keep the whole household at home for 14 days if you live with others
DO follow the directions below

Find out what to do if you are getting worse

Please follow these directions

Please self-isolate to prevent potential spread

Please do not come to the surgery

 

SHORTCUT TO HERE ivy.gs/scenarios or ivy.gs/covid-q

SCENARIOS - WHAT TO DO IN SPECIFIC SITUATIONS ESSENTIAL

This continues to be an emerging situation so here we apply current guidance and general medical advice to some scenarios that patients may come across

I've developed viral symptoms or flu

If you have a fever, new cough or loss of smell or taste, then you should self-isolate as defined above.

Common symptoms for coronavirus (as with other viral illnesses) include: fever. dry cough, tiredness, shortness of breath, bone or joint pain, sore throat, headache, chills. Loss of sense of smell (and taste) is also an increasingly recognised symptom).

If you do develop viral symptoms, you could have a viral illness like flu, a flu-like illness or coronavirus.

You do not automatically need to call or see a GP just because you have a viral illness.

There is no specific cure for viral illnesses like flu, or for coronavirus for that matter. Any treatment aims to relieve symptoms only, which for a viral illness includes rest, paracetamol and plenty of fluids - please follow NHS advice .

Find out what to do if you are getting worse

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

Next time, please consider having a flu jab if you are eligible.

Can't you just check me out?

If you have a fever, new cough or loss of smell or taste, then you should self-isolate as defined above.

Your GP cannot 'check you' to tell you if it definitely is coronavirus or not and your GP does not have any access to testing. You need to self-refer for testing if you need one.

Given community spread of coronavirus, you might well have it if you develop the above symptoms. It is therefore very important that you self-isolate to prevent further spread of infection. This is to protect yourself and others. Please do not come to surgery.

There is no specific treatment for coronavirus, antibiotics do not help.

Find out what to do if you are getting worse

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

Next time, please consider having a flu jab if you are eligible.

Am I classed as vulnerable (moderate risk) for coronavirus? SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-vulnerable

In general, those more vulnerable to complications on contracting coronavirus are those patients who are over 70, have underlying long-term conditions, or pregnant women.

If you are eligible to have a flu jab on medical grounds each year, then you are likely classed as vulnerable.

Those classed as vulnerable will not receive any notification from the NHS or from their GP. If you fall into a vulnerable group, you are strongly advised to follow social distancing guidance.

Read official advice on social distancing and protecting vulnerable groups .

Whatever medical condition you have, the best way to remain well is to avoid catching it in the first place.

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection in general.

Five things you can do to protect yourself and your community

Practical things you can do to help flatten the curve

Read official guidance on shielding and protecting extremely vulnerable patients and see immediately below.

If you are in a vulnerable group and feel you need help at home, find out more here .

Am I classed as extremely vulnerable (very high risk) for coronavirus (shielding group)? SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-veryhighrisk

Some patients are classed as being at very high risk of severe illness requiring admission to hospital if they were to contract coronavirus.

Such patients are being identified by the NHS centrally and also by their GP.

Those at extremely high risk will be advised to shield. This is a measure to keep these people safe, and essentially means staying at home at all times, and avoiding any face-to-face contact for at least 12 weeks.

UPDATE JUN 5, 2020: People who are shielding remain vulnerable and should continue to take precautions but can now leave their home if they wish, as long as they are able to maintain strict social distancing.

The government plans to write to all shielded patients directly with information about next steps.

UPDATE JUN 23, 2020: From July 6, people who are shielding may: meet in a group of up to 6 people outdoors; no longer observe social distancing with other members of their household; and form a ‘support bubble’ with one other household, without needing to socially distance. All the other current shielding advice will remain unchanged at this time.

From August 1, provided there are no significant increases in incidents they may: go to work, if they can’t work from home, as long as the business is COVID-safe; return to their education settings (children) if they are eligible; go outside to buy food, to places of worship and for exercise.

Very high risk groups for shielding
  • Solid organ transplant recipients
  • People with specific cancers
    • People with cancer who are undergoing active chemotherapy or radical radiotherapy for lung cancer
    • People with cancers of the blood or bone marrow such as leukaemia, lymphoma or myeloma who are at any stage of treatment
    • People having immunotherapy or other continuing antibody treatments for cancer
    • People having other targeted cancer treatments which can affect the immune system, such as protein kinase inhibitors or PARP inhibitors
    • People who have had bone marrow or stem cell transplants in the last 6 months, or who are still taking immunosuppression drugs
  • People with severe respiratory conditions including all cystic fibrosis, severe asthma and severe COPD
  • People with rare diseases and inborn errors of metabolism that significantly increase the risk of infections (such as SCID, homozygous sickle cell)
  • People on immunosuppression therapies sufficient to significantly increase risk of infection
  • People who are pregnant with significant heart disease, congenital or acquired
  • Renal dialysis patients
If you are on the shielding list
  • Those at high risk will be notified either by personalised letter or text, and will receive further advice and information on how to access support.
  • Depending on your age and conditions, our care co-ordinator may contact you to offer support.
  • If you are identified as being at high risk, you are advised to follow official government guidance to shield.
  • Due to a high level of calls we are receiving regarding this issue, we advise all patients to see below and/or read frequently asked questions about this issue before getting in touch with us.
  • Please also check the list of high risk groups above, which has been determined centrally by the NHS.
  • Those at high risk will receive a personalised letter, either from us or from the NHS centrally which can be shown to others as needed.
  • We have no control over centrally-sent NHS letters. If you think you have been sent one in error, please see below.
  • We regret we cannot supply any other documentary evidence in this situation, nor any documentatry evidence to anyone else who is not in the high risk group.
I've been removed from the shielding list
  • We have been instructed by NHS England to review the record of every patient identified centrally and also the record of every patient who has self-reported as being at high risk
  • We need to do this because shielding is a severe measure that has risks to your mental and physical wellbeing and this has to be balanced against the benefits from such measures, so we do not put anyone into shielding lightly
  • If you have been removed, this means we have checked your records and determined you are not at very high risk
  • However, as you might still be at moderate risk, we still advise that you strongly follow social distancing guidance in order to keep yourself safe
  • If you still want to shield even if you are not in the shielding group, then this is a personal choice
I don't want to be on the shielding list
  • If you do not want to shield, then again, this is a personal choice
  • We would generally recommend thåat you follow shielding guidance, but if you do not wish to, then you should at least strongly follow social distancing guidance
  • If you think you have been put into the shielding group due to an error in your records, we ask that you check the very high risk groups above first
  • If you still don't know why you are in the shielding group, please ring us and we can tell you
get more information

Read official frequently asked questions .

Read official guidance on shielding and protecting extremely vulnerable patients .

Read official frequently asked questions on extremely vulnerable patients .

If you are in a vulnerable group and feel you need help at home, find out more here .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection in general.

Five things you can do to protect yourself and your community

Read official advice on social distancing and protecting vulnerable groups .

If you are in an extremely vulnerable group, you can officially check and/or register for support here .

I need someone to help me at home SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-needhelp

You have several options on getting help if you are vulnerable or extremely vulnerable:

Download all the above links as a document you can print out.

Information for carers can be found on our Carers page.


Derbyshire Community Response Unit

This service can help if you have no friends or family you can call on and:

  • You are self-isolating because you or a member of your household is at risk
  • You are struggling to meet your basic needs because of financial, social or health restrictions
  • You are pregnant
  • You have underlying health conditions
  • You are aged 70 or over

They can help with shopping, fetching prescriptions or finding someone to have a chat with.

If you need help you can use the link below to register or you can ring 01629 535091 - Monday to Friday 9am to 5pm, Saturday 9am to 1pm, or email ASCH.CommunityResponseUnit@derbyshire.gov.uk.

Derbyshire's Community Response Unit .

Requests are sent out to community partners such as AV CVS to fulfil.

Download an information leaflet .

Amber Valley Community Voluntary Service

Amber Valley Community Volunary Service (AVCVS) is based in Ripley, Derbyshire and is the local organisation for the district’s voluntary sector and the main provider of support for local voluntary and community groups.

AVCVS offers a range of support and services to respond to the needs of volunteers, voluntary organisations and community groups.

Email Paulclarke@avcvs.org or ring 01773 748688.

Request an NHS volunteer via GoodSAM

You can now request an NHS volunteer through GoodSAM and NHS volunteers and access a variety of different support options:

Check in and chat support to individuals who are at risk of loneliness as a consequence of self-isolation.

Community support provides collection of shopping, medication or other essential supplies for someone who is self-isolating, and delivering these supplies to their home.

Patient Transport support provides transport to take patients home who are medically fit for discharge.

NHS Transport support provides transport for equipment, supplies and/or medication between NHS services and sites. Also involves assisting pharmacies with medication delivery.

Find your local Covid-19 Mutual Aid group

Find your local coronavirus support group at Covid-19 Mutual Aid .

Covid-19 Mutual Aid UK is a group co-ordinating local support for the most vulnerable in our communities.

In this area, there is the Ripley Community Covid Support Group and Corona Virus Helpers Heage And Surrounding Villages .

Contact the Royal Voluntary Service

Contact the Royal Voluntary Service for help and support.

The Royal Voluntary Service co-ordinates olunteers providing much-needed support for over-stretched public services and for people as they age.

Ring 0330 555 0310, 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday.

Register for support on official government website

If you are in an extremely vulnerable group, you can officially check and/or register for support here .

Where can I volunteer to help in the efforts against coronavirus?

Your NHS needs you!

NHS Volunteer Responders has been set up to support the NHS during the coronavirus outbreak. To do this the NHS needs an 'army' of volunteers who can support the 1.5m people in England who are at most risk from the virus to stay well.

Find out more about NHS Volunteer Responders .

See also Covid-19 Mutual Aid UK which co-ordinates neighbourly initiatives and has lists of local groups in your area,.

The Royal Voluntary Service is a national charity built on local volunteering giving support to the people that need it in hospitals and communities.

If you are a business looking to help in the efforts against coronavirus, and can provide help such as protective equipment like masks, gowns and sanitiser, medical equipment, logistics, please register the support of your business .

I want a test for coronavirus! SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-test

If you have a fever, new cough or loss of smell or taste, then you should self-isolate as defined above.

Given significant community spread of coronavirus, you might well have it if you develop the above symptoms.

UPDATE JUN 9, 2020: Despite being announced in the media, we are unable to request antibody testing for any patient at this time, as the focus on testing is on healthcare staff currently.

Apply for a test if you are an essential worker .

Read user guide for essential workers booking a test .

Ask for a test to check if you have coronavirus symptoms .

Apply for coronavirus tests for a care home .

Call 119 if you need a test and you have no internet access.

Read Test and Trace strategy Q&A .

Read Test and Trace workplace guidance .

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

I have a query about school SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-school

General information

Schools, colleges and other educational settings are working very hard to review the government guidelines alongside their own risks assessments to determine the safety of a phased reopening of their institution.

These measures are overseen by the head teacher, the senior leadership and appropriate governing body (or equivalent) for each school’s individual circumstances.

Parents/carers need to work with schools if they have individual concerns about their child.

It is the parents' and carers' choice as to whether they feel it is safe, and not for a GP to decide.

Teachers and other employed staff will also need to work with schools if they have concerns about their own health and whether they can safely return to face-to-face work.

GPs have not been provided with additional/specific guidance regarding decision making for staff or students beyond current public health measures.

Shielded and vulnerable children

Please follow this link from the Royal Collage of Paediatrics and Child Health which states that:.

  • Clinically extremely vulnerable children to remain shielded and not to return to school, even if their year group has
  • Clinically vulnerable children who are only under the care of their GP are overwhelmingly likely to benefit from returning to school when their year group does
  • Clinically vulnerable children, who are under specialist hospital care for an underlying health condition are, on the balance of probabilities, more likely to benefit from returning to school when their year group does so - you may need to speak with your hospital team for further advice
  • All other children should attend school when their year group returns
Children living in a household with vulnerable household member

Children who live in a household with someone who is extremely clinically vulnerable and shielding should only attend if stringent social distancing can be adhered to and the child or young person is able to understand and follow those instructions.

Children and young people who live with someone who is clinically vulnerable (but not extremely clinically vulnerable) as defined in the social distancing guidance and including those who are pregnant, can attend.

GP letters or notes

GPs will not be issuing notes or letters on behalf of parents or carers if they do not wish to send their child to school or their child is shielding for themselves, or to protect family members who are shielding and/or vulnerable.

Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

If you choose not to send your child to school

The government has already announced that parents will not be fined for non-attendance at this time.

Official guidance

Guidance note from Derbyshire LMC for parents .

Read guidance for parents and carers on opening of schools .

Read guidance for schools during the coronavirus outbreak .

Read all education and childcare guidance in coronavirus outbreak .

How do I treat my coronavirus infection?

You should be following directions for self-isolating as described above.

If you are a confirmed case of coronavirus, you might be transferred to and cared for in a specialist centre, or if your symptoms are mild, you might be advised to self-isolate at home, either by Public Health or 111.

You may have fever, cough or breathlessness or general viral symptoms or only mild or even no symptoms.

There is no specific cure for coronavirus. Any treatment aims to relieve symptoms only, which for a viral illness includes rest, paracetamol and plenty of fluids - please follow NHS advice .

There is no vaccine yet available.

Find out what to do if you are getting worse

Ring 111 if you develop symptoms or become unwell.

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

I'm self-isolating but getting worse

Use the 111 coronavirus service (or ring 111 if no online access):

  • If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  • If your condition gets worse
  • If your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

Example of getting worse might be:

  • You become so short of breath that you cannot climb stairs
  • You cannot finish speaking a sentence
  • You have stopped doing all the things you usually do

Ring 999 if you are very poorly, and inform them of your symptoms and that you are self-isolating.

Need more advice?

Anybody can use the 111 coronavirus service to find out what to do next. Please do not come to surgery.

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

Can I have chloroquine / dexamethasone?

Current guidance is that hydroxychloroquine and chloroquine should be used only as part of a clinical trial for the treatment of coronavirus.

Dexamethasone is approved to treat all UK hospitalised COVID-19 patients requiring oxygen, including those on ventilators, from June 16, 2020.

If you do not already take such medication, please do not book an appointment to request them.

We will not prescribe them to you. Repeat prescriptions will continue to be issued to those existing patients with current clinical need for these medications and for licensed purposes only.

I'm self-isolating as advised, what happens at the end?

You should be following directions for self-isolating as described above.

After 7 days, if you feel better and no longer have a high temperature, you can return to normal activity.

If you still have a high temperature, continue to self-isolate until your temperature returns to normal.

You may still have a cough for some weeks after, this is normal. It does not mean you have to stay at home for more than 7 days.

If you do not get any better, continue to self-isolate and use the 111 coronavirus service . Please do not come to surgery.

Need more advice?

Anybody can use the 111 coronavirus service to find out what to do next. Please do not come to surgery.

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

I'm not going to self-isolate, I feel fine

If you have a fever, new cough or loss of smell or taste, then you should self-isolate as described above.

Whilst in yourself, you might feel not too bad, and wonder what the fuss is about, a significant proportion of those who get coronavirus will have severe disease and a good number will need intensive or critical care.

It is therefore vital to self-isolate so that you do not spread infection to others in the community, some of whom may be vulnerable:

  • Your family, including grandparents
  • Your friends
  • Your work colleagues
  • The elderly
  • Pregnant women
  • Those with long-term medical conditions

Self-isolation means exactly that, you must not leave your home. Please do not come to surgery.

Patients should be aware that under new emergency legislation the Police have the power to detain people infected or possibly infected with coronavirus.

Need more advice?

Anybody can use the 111 coronavirus service to find out what to do next. Please do not come to surgery.

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

See Why can't I come to surgery? below.

I'm self-isolating so I need a sick note SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-isolationnote

In a situation such as this, self-isolation would be advised officially by 111 or Public Health for contact with a confirmed case, or a suspected case, or whilst awaiting results of a coronavirus test.

By law, a doctor's fit note (sick note or MED 3) is not required for the first 7 days of sickness absence.

After 7 days, a doctor's note may be required - it is actually for the employer to determine what evidence is required, if any, which may or may not be a doctor's note.

The government strongly suggests that employers use their discretion around the need for medical evidence for a period of absence where an employee is advised to self-isolate in accordance with Public Health advice being issued by the government.

This means that a doctor's note will not necessarily be required. Please download this information sheet .

Use the new NHS 111 isolation note service .

Emergency legislation is being brought in to allow employees to claim statutory sick pay from the first day off work in order to help contain coronavirus.

Please note, if you are not following any official 111 or Public Health guidance to self-isolate, but you have made the decision yourself to do so, you are not entitled to a doctor's note at all in this situation.

For queries regarding requests for GP letters related to the coronavirus pandemic, please see our GP letters section immediately below.

Check official guidance for employees .

Check official guidance for employers and businesses .

Follow official advice for self-isolation .

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection.

I need a GP letter SHORTCUT ivy.gs/covid-gpletter

I need a GP letter because I'm not going on holiday now

If you have changed your mind and decided not to go on holiday, you do not need a letter from the GP.

Insurers and travel companies should be basing their decisions to offer refunds on advice from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Public Health England, not letters from GPs. Professor Martin Marshall, chair of the Royal College of GPs

Check official foreign travel advice regarding coronavirus and official foreign travel advice by country .

Check our forms and documents policy where it states that we are happy to complete travel cancellation forms if we have been attending you for medical conditions for which we have advised that you cancel or postpone your holiday. We will not write a letter for any other reason.

Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

If you are going away, please check out this infographic guide on staying safe.

I need a GP letter because my boss at work says so

If you need a note for your employer because you are self-isolating due to coronavirus or have coronavirus in your household, please see our information on self-isolation or use the shortcut ivy.gs/covid-isolationnote. We will not supply sick notes for self-isolation purposes.

If you are in the shielding group, you will have received a text or letter from the NHS or ourselves about this. You can use this letter as evidence for your employer or others, and there is no need for a further letter from us to confirm your status.

It is not for your GP to perform or sign-off on any risk assessment for you in your workplace - this is your employer's responsibility.

It is not for your GP to authorise any return to work or home-working plan - this is for your employer or the human resources or occupational health department.

Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

Should your employer need specific medical information about you or a report about your condition, we will not be able to provide such information to them without a copy of your written consent. Such information will be subject to a fee as this is private work not covered by normal NHS service. If this is required, please ask your employer to put such requests in writing to us.

I need a GP letter because of schooling

Please see our dedicated section regarding coronavirus and schooling or use the shortcut ivy.gs/covid-school.

Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

I need a GP letter to exempt me from wearing a face covering/mask

It is not for your GP to authorise any exemption from wearing a mask.

Face coverings are not to protect you. However, if you are infected but have not yet developed symptoms, it may provide some protection for others you come into close contact with.

From a public health point of view, we cannot authorise you to not wear a mask where it is appropriate.

The legislation states that: No person may, without reasonable excuse, use a public transport service without wearing a face covering. The only reasonable excuses for medical purposes for not wearing masks are if someone cannot put on, wear or remove a face covering— (i) because of any physical or mental illness or impairment, or disability (within the meaning of section 6 of the Equality Act 2010), or (ii) without severe distress;

At no point does the legislation or any other regulation require GPs to provide letters of confirmation of these conditions and we therefore politely decline such requests for letters.

Download an information sheet.

Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

I need a GP letter because I need to self-isolate before hospital admission

This has nothing to do with GPs. You have various options:

  • The admission letter from the hospital should be sufficient evidence for an employer.
  • Go to the NHS isolation note service and declare 'yes' to the question: “Have you been told to self-isolate by an NHS service or a healthcare professional?” and if you then tick the box that says “I have been told to self-isolate by a test and trace service” they will be able to get a self-isolation note sent to you.
  • Download this template letter for your employer.
  • Please do not book an appointment to request such letters from us.

I've had coronavirus - what advice can you give me?

You may have residual symptoms after having had coronavirus infection. This is a new condition and more information regarding after effects of infection are emerging.

Please see our dedicated section regarding post-covid recovery or use the shortcut ivy.gs/covid-postcovid or ivy.gs/postcovid.

I'm well, but worried about coronavirus

If you are well, the best way to remain well is to avoid catching it in the first place.

This advice applies whatever medical condition you have.

Follow precautions to prevent spread of infection in general.

Five things you can do to protect yourself and your community

Practical things you can do to help flatten the curve

Keep up with updates on coronavirus with the links below or follow this page. We will try to keep this page regularly updated with the changing guidance, as long as we've not been taken out by someone infecting us.

We will aim to keep this page regularly updated with the changing guidance, as long as we've not been taken out by someone infecting us, so please do not come to surgery if you have it.

All this coronavirus is affecting my mental health!

These are very anxious times for everybody.

Because this virus is entirely new, no-one physically, or figuratively, is immune from its effects.

Everybody has been affected in some way, be it, with colleagues self-isolating or sick, with workplace changes, with national lockdown. One cannot help but be moved by the tragic stories we hear all around the world.

If you feel you need more help and support, please visit the new mental health section of our General Practice 2.0 page or use the shortcut ivy.gs/covid-mentalhealth. We have built this page specially to help those who are struggling with their mental health during this current crisis.

NHS staff who are finding their mental health is being affected during this pandemic can visit a special section on this page for staff, or use the ivy.gs/covid-staffhealth.

Isn't it just the flu? Why the big fuss?

Hmmm, where have you been these last few months?

Coronavirus is definitely NOT just the flu. The key issue is that in a significant proportion of people affected, it causes severe illness, and these patients may then require intensive care. There is then a risk that even advanced healthcare systems are overwhelmed by lots of very sick people all at the same time.

The following links might be useful:

HOW DO I PREVENT SPREAD?

The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to the virus

Most of the following is good practice for everyone, to reduce infection risk in general

WHY CAN'T I COME TO SURGERY? ESSENTIAL

WE ARE NOT EQUIPPED TO HANDLE CORONAVIRUS

Coronavirus is classed as an 'airborne high consequence infectious disease'.

On January 30, 2020, the British government raised the risk level to moderate.

On January 31, 2020, WHO declared coronavirus as a 'public health emergency of international concern'.

On February 10, 2020, the British government declared coronavirus a 'serious and imminent threat to public health'.

On March 3, 2020, NHS England declared coronavirus a level 4 incident - the highest level of emergency preparedness planning.

On March 11, 2020, WHO declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic.

On March 12, 2020, the British government raised the risk level to high and described the outbreak as the 'worst public health crisis for a generation'.

By turning up at surgery, you risk the surgery being placed into a state of lockdown and you will be putting yourself and others at risk. This cannot be stressed enough!

PLEASE DO NOT BOOK AN APPOINTMENT WITH US.

PLEASE DO NOT COME TO SURGERY.

PLEASE USE THE 111 CORONAVIRUS SERVICE (OR RING 111 if no online access).

 

MYTHBUSTERS POPULAR

 

WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFO?

Scan these codes with your phone camera (or just click them) for quick access to info

NHS 111 online coronavirus service

111 online coronavirus

NHS 111 online coronavirus service

NHS: coronavirus advice

NHS 111 online coronavirus service

GOV.UK latest info

NHS 111 online coronavirus service

GOV.UK all primary care guidance

You might find these pages helpful:

SHORTCUT TO HERE ivy.gs/guidance or ivy.gs/covid-gp

Guidance for GPs

This section lists public guidance available for GPs





DISCLAIMER

This page is © Dr M Wong 2020 and is compiled from multiple sources for ease of use by patients and is for guidance only. The information shown is not intended to be a full and comprehensive guide to coronavirus, nor is it intended to replace the advice of the 111 service or that of a dedicated health professional.

If you are concerned that you have or might have coronavirus, please follow current guidance on self-isolation and if you are getting worse, pleaseuse the 111 coronavirus service (or ring 111 if no online access). Do not come to the surgery.

Contact us

If you wish to provide feedback on the contents of this page, please get in touch. If any other GP surgeries wish to share or link to this page, please let us know first. Please do not cut and paste content as it is liable to change on a regular basis.

Coronavirus Pandemic
Restricted service only
Visit our GP 2.0 advice page